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Academic Units

Course Syllabi

CORE INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING COURSES

IE-101 Introduction to Industrial Engineering
Type of Course: Lecture, Case Studies, Class Discussions and Workshops
Year: 1
Semester: Fall
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Metin Göker

Objectives and Contents:The basic objective of this course is to give the students a wide - angle view of Industrial Engineering and help them to understand the basic contents, techniques, and methodologies of their chosen field of specialization. The course includes both classical and conventional IE approaches and the most recent developments in the world. Also analyzing the developing trends will give the students an overview of the future of IE. Case studies from the developed countries as well as from Turkey are aimed to enhance the vision of the student.Industrial Revolution and the early developmental history of Industrial Engineering. Frederick W.Taylor and the basic foundations of Scientific Management. Raising interest in organizational strategy and structure after the First World War. Second World War and aftermath. New developments in Industry Engineering. Motion and Time Study and other methods for increasing productivity. Mass Production, Production Control and Statistical Quality Control. After 1980' s Japan' s invasion of global markets. The raising interest in the Western World in Japanese ways ' Kaizen, Zero Defect, Just in time, Lean Manufacturing, Group Technologies and other techniques. The answer of the West to the Japanese hurricane. Process re-engineering, Corporate re-invention and re-engineering, morale, motivation and teamwork. Newly developed other techniques ' supply chain management, computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD ' CAM), Computer based management, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP ' MRP I ' MRP II). Systems Analysis and Design, Management Information and Decision Support System, Research and Development. Where the World Goes' The Future of Industrial Engineering.

Recommended Reading:
Methods Engineering, Krick
Strategy and Structure, Alfred P. Chandler
The Process of Management, Newman and Summer
Management ' Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices, Peter F. Drucker
Supply Chain Management and Advanced Planning, Stedler et al.
Liberation Management, Tom Peters
Kaizen, Maseaki Imai
The Six Sigma Way, 2000 Peter S. Ponde, et al.
Jack Welch and General Electric Way, Robert Slatter
Seminar Notes by Metin Göker : Power Point Presentation notes developed by Metin Göker related to the above mentioned topics (For a complete list of seminars look at www.yonbiltek.com

Assessment Tools: One midterm and one final examination

Instruction Language: English

 

IE-201 Introduction to System Analysis
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 2
Semester: Fall
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
Instructor: Assoc. Prof. Gülçin Büyüközkan

Objectives and Contents:
The aim of the course is to give industrial engineering students the basic concepts of systems, and the principles of systems analysis. Essentials and techniques of systems analysis and the application of related techniques to real life industrial problems and organizational systems will be taught to the students. Specifically, the students will be able to
  • Understand subject matter of systems and its importance in real life
  • Analyze and improve systems that include people, materials, information, equipment, and energy
  • Design a system or process to meet desired needs
  • Function on multidisciplinary teams

An introduction to systems and systems thinking; General systems theory; Systems structure; Systems environment; Sub-systems, hierarchy and interactions; Complex systems; Characteristics of complex systems; System flow diagrams; Analyzing different systems (production, service, physical etc.); Designing effective systems; Analytical, technical and management skills required of a systems analyst.

Recommended Reading:
There is no required textbook. My lecture notes and selected topics from
Donald W. Boyd, Systems Analysis and Modeling, A Macro-to-Micro Approach with Multidisciplinary Applications, Academic Press, 2001 will be used.
Additional readings will be handed out in class or distributed via e-mail.

Teaching Methods: Lecture notes, case studies and applications.

Assessment Tools: Two homeworks, class participation, term project, final exam.

Instruction Language: English



IE-202 Probability & Statistics
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 2
Semester:Spring
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Assoc. Prof.Nurhan Davutyan

Objectives and Contents:
The aim is to help students learn probability and its practical uses. The cornerstone in this task is to help students grasp the following point: the sample average as well as the sample variance themselves are random variables. The theory of this point is called ' sampling distribution' . Estimation and hypothesis testing are based on this insight.

Recommended Reading:
Probability & Statistics (7' th Int. ed) by Walpole,Myers,Myers,Ye, (WM) Publisher: Parson/Prentice Hall
N. Davutyan and A. Ozluk, ' Olasılık Kuramı ve Aydınlanma Düşüncesi' Toplumsal Tarih No 142 (Ekim 2005). Will be on our course' s website.

Instruction Language: English

 

IE-222 Ergonomics
Type of Course: Lecture, Class Discussions and Term papers (optional)
Year: 2
Semester: Spring
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Metin Göker

Objectives and Contents: To give the students an overall understanding of the human mind and the body both from medical and engineering point of views. Analyze and evaluate the human performance, reactions, and behavioral patterns under different jobs, work conditions, and environments. Thus, to obtain the basic knowledge to design the man-machine systems for ease and efficiency. Especially to understand and learn the design requirements for faster automobiles, fighter planes, space crafts, and other newly developed gadgets, and products that forces the endurance limits of human operators.The ergonomic knowledge base. Anthropology and anthropometry. Human biomechanics, the skeletal system, human strength. How the bodyworks. The respiratory system, the circulatory system, the metabolic system. Energy requirements at work. How the mind works. Organization of the nervous system. Central and peripheral nervous system Brain and Spinal Cord. Ergonomic uses of the nervous signals. Human senses. Body sensors. Seeing ' the vision sense. Hearing ' the auditory sense, Smelling. Tasting, Touching. Balancing the body. Engineering use of sensory capabilities. How the body interacts with the environment. Thermoregulation of the human body. Working in polluted air. Working strenuously in high altitudes. Astronauts and weightlessness. Acceleration in aerospace. Aerospace human engineering. Body Rhythms, Work Schedules and effects of alcohol.  Design Applications. Ergonomic models, methods and measurements. Designing to fit the moving body. Designing for the sitting and standing operator. Designing for foot operation. Designing for hand use. Designing for hand tools. The office workstation design. Selection, design and arrangements of controls, and displays, Handling Loads. Designing for special populations.

Recommended Reading:
Karl Kroemer, How to Design for Ease and Efficiency.
David J. Oborne, Ergonomics at Work ' Human Factors in Design and Development.

Assessment Tools: One midterm and one final examination

Instruction Language: English.

 

IE-311 Operations Research I
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 3
Semester: Fall
ECTS: 6
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Zeki Ayağ

Objectives and Contents: The overall objective of this course is to introduce and explore issues to Operations Research I. To serve this objective each class has structured around two objectives that involve: a lecture for theoretical information and related applications intended to reinforce and elaborate upon the main concepts of the course. Introduction to Operation Research (OR), Introduction to Modeling, Introduction to Linear Programming (LP), Solving LP Problems: The Simplex Method, Theory of the Simplex Method, Duality Theory and Sensitivity Analysis, LP Applications, Network Analysis, Dynamic Modeling, Integer Programming.

Recommended Reading:
Frederick S. Hillier and Gerald J. Lieberman, Introduction to Operations Research, 8th Ed. 2005.
Lecture notes and Power Point slides will be distributed after each course.

Teaching Methods: Lecture notes, case studies and applications.

Assessment Tools: Class participation, midterm and final exam

Instruction Language: English

 

IE-321 Factory Design & Layout
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 3
Semester: Fall
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Zeki Ayağ

Objectives and Contents: The overall objective of this course is to introduce and explore issues to Factory Design and Plant Layout. To serve this objective each class has structured around two objectives that involve: a lecture for theoretical information and related applications intended to reinforce and elaborate upon the main concepts of the course. Int. to Manufacturing Facilities Design and Material Handling, Sources of Information for Manufacturing Facilities Design, Time Study, Process Design, Flow Analysis Techniques, Activity Relationship Analysis, Auxiliary Services Requirement Space, Material Handling, Material Handling Equipment, Office Layout Techniques and Space Requirements, Area Location/Facilities Design ' The Layout

Recommended Reading:
F. E. Meyers, M.P. Stephens,Manufacturing Facilities Design and Material Handling, 3rd Ed., 2005.
Lecture notes and PowerPoint slides will be distributed after each course.

Teaching Methods: Lecture notes, case studies and applications.

Assessment Tools: Class participation, midterm and final exam.

Instruction Language: English

 

IE-331 Management Information Systems
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 2
Semester: Fall
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Assoc. Prof. Yıldız Y. Güzey

Objectives and Contents: This class introduces students to Management Information Systems foundations, strategies, current trends, MIS technology fundamentals, applications to business functions and management practice. Teach studentsto Analyze the information needs of knowledge workers and management information systems. Provide students with an understanding of the use of information systems. Provide an overview of the uses of information by organizational subsystems. Enable students to understand the role of information technology. Prepare students for identifying, analyzing, and proposing possible information systems solutions to organizational problems.
Contents: Triangle, Strategic, Organizational, Information, Information, Architecture, Doing, Using, The, Funding, Project, Knowledge

Recommended Reading:
Keri Pearlson & Carol Saunders, Managing and Using Information Systems: A Strategic Approach. 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Kenneth C. Laudon & Jane P. Laudon; Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm 7th Ed. Prentice Hall, Publisher.

Teaching Methods: Case Study, Lecture, Presentations

Assessment Tools: Midterm +Team Work, Final

Instruction Language: English

 

IE-312 Operations Research II
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 3
Semester: Spring
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Zeki Ayağ

Objectives and Contents: The overall objective of this course is to introduce and explore issues to Operations Research II. To serve this objective each class has structured around two objectives that involve: A lecture for theoretical information and related applications intended to reinforce and elaborate upon the main concepts of the course. Nonlinear Programming, Game Theory, Decision Analysis, Markov Chains, Queueing Theory, Markov Decision Processes.

Recommended Reading:
Frederick S. Hillier and Gerald J. Lieberman, Introduction to Operations Research, 8th Ed. 2005.
Lecture notes and PowerPoint slides will be distributed after each course.

Teaching Methods: Lecture notes, case studies and applications.

Assessment Tools: Class participation, midterm and final exam.

Instruction Language: English

 

IE-332 System Simulation
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 3
Semester: Spring
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Zeki Ayağ

Objectives and Contents: The primary purpose of this course is to provide the student with a broad knowledge base in the field of simulation. Students will be exposed to the elements of system simulation. Introduction to Simulation, Simulation Examples, General Principles, Simulation Software, Statistical Models in Simulation, Queueing Models, Random-Number Generation, Random-Variate Generation,Input Modeling, Verification and Validation of Simulation Models, Output Analysis for a Single Model, Simulation of Manufacturing and Material-Handling Systems

Recommended Reading:
Jerry Banks, John Carson, Barry L. Nelson, David Nicol, Discrete-Event System Simulation, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2004.
Lecture notes and PowerPoint slides will be distributed after each course.

Teaching Methods: Lecture notes, case studies and applications

Assessment Tools: Class participation, project, midterm and final exam

Instruction Language: English

 

IE-342 Materials Management
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 3
Semester: Spring
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Assoc. Prof. Gülçin Büyüközkan

Objectives and Contents: This course addresses the issues and approaches associated with managing the inventory and flow of raw materials, work-in-process, finished goods, and supplies to ensure/enhance the organization' s competitiveness and profitability. The concepts, principles, and strategic impact of the more significant approaches in production/inventory planning and control, such as just in time systems, material requirements planing, and enterprise resource planning, will also be discussed. The primary objectives of this course are to:

  • explain the significance of materials management and logistics functions
  • describe the effect of classical and modern techniques used in the flow of goods (and information)
  • discuss generally the impact on the organization that could occur from the choice and use of the various tools and techniques available
  • analyze the flow of goods (and information) in the acquisition of raw materials through production and distribution
  • apply practical tools that production and inventory control practitioners commonly use.

Introduction to Materials Management; Material Requirements Planning ' Manufacturing Resource Planning; Forecasting; Inventory Fundamentals; Procurement; Warehousing and Material Handling; Physical Distribution; Supply Chain Management; Enterprise Resource Planning; Just in Time Systems and Lean Operations; Materials Management in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors; Global Materials Mgmt.; Measurement and Evaluation of Materials Management Activities.

Recommended Reading:
There is no required textbook. My lecture notes and selected topics from
Richard J. Tersine, Principles of Inventory and Materials Management, 4th edition, Prentice-Hall, , 1994.
J. R. Tony Arnold, Steve Chapman, Introduction To Materials Management, Prentice-Hall, April 2005.
Edward Frazelle, World-Class Warehousing and Material Handling, McGraw-Hill, 2002.
John J. Coyle, Edward J. Bardi, C. John Langley, Management of Business Logistics: A Supply Chain Perspective, South-Western College Pub., 7th edition, 2002
will be used.
Cases studies and additional readings will be handed out in class or distributed via e-mail.

Teaching Methods: Lecture notes, case studies and applications

Assessment Tools: Class participation, case presentation and report, term project, final exam

Instruction Language: English

 

IE-401 Production Planning & Control
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 2
Semester: Fall
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Rifat Gürcan Özdemir

Objectives and Contents: The aim of the course is to give industrial engineering students the basic definitions and nature of production systems along with the theory and application of the well-known methodologies for solving production planning and control problems, which will be very helpful to understand the industrial problems and to find a solution to them. Next, the course aims to make industrial engineering students feel confident while approaching to a real-life problem of production planning and control context. Specifically, the students will be able to

  • Understand subject matter of production planning and control, and its contribution to their industrial engineering career
  • Recognize the use of methodologies of production planning and control
  • Analyze production planning related problems and find solutions for them

Introduction to the production systems (approx. 3 classes), demand forecasting techniques (approx. 9 classes), aggregate production planning (approx. 8 classes), inventory management (approx. 10 classes), materials requirement planning and capacity planning (approx. 6 classes), job scheduling and sequencing (approx. 6 classes).

Recommended Reading:
Johnson, L.A. and Montgomery, D.C., Operations Research in Production Planning, Scheduling, and Inventory Control, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1974.
Sipper, D. and Bulfin, Jr., R.L., Production: Planning, Control, and Integration, McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1998.
M. Parkin (2003) Economics, 6th edition, Addison Wesley.
Steven Nahmias, Production & Operations Analysis, Fifth edition, McGraw-Hill, 2005.

Teaching Methods:

Assessment Tools: Five quizzes, five assignment sets, one midterm exam and final exam

Instruction Language: English

 

IE-411 Management & Organization
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 4
Semester: Fall
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Prof. Enar A. Tunç

Objectives and Contents: Competing with Operations (After this session, the students will be able to: Describe operations, Explain how operations management is fundamental to both manufacturing and service providers, Explain how to use operations strategy to achieve certain competitive priorities, Explain how to link marketing strategy and operations strategy), Process Management (After this session, the students will be able to: Describe each of the main process decisions, Explain how to analyze a process, Describe the key elements of reengineering), Forecasting (After this session, the students will be able to: Understand the importance of forecasting in an organization, Know the input requirements and outputs of a forecasting system identify the demand patterns in a time series, compute forecasts using the most common approaches for time-series forecasting, know how to monitor and control the performance of a forecasting method), Inventory Management (After this session, the students will be able to: Describe the cost and service trade-offs involved in inventory decisions, Answer three questions concerning inventory decisions: what, when and how many, Understand the importance of accurate inventory records), Aggregate Planning and Scheduling (After this session, students will be able to: understand the reason for aggregation in the planning process, know and evaluate different types of aggregate planning alternatives, understand scheduling in manufacturing, know how to schedule workforce to allow each employee two consecutive days off), Resource Planning (After this session, students will be able to: know master scheduling, understand material requirements planning), Supply Chain Management (After this session, students will be able to: understand the importance of supply chain management for manufacturing and service organizations, Distinguish between different types of supply chains, Understand the dynamics of supply chains), Quality Management (After this session, the students will be able to: define quality, describe the principles of TQM, discuss how control charts are used, construct x-bar and r charts and use them to determine whether the process is in statistical control, Determine the process capability), Waiting Line Analysis (After this session, students will be able to: understand the need for better management of waiting lines, compute the best number of servers in a given waiting line system), Managing Project Processes (After this session, students will be able to: understand how to monitor and control projects, determine the critical path, compute the probability of completing the project on time), Overview of Operations Management (After this session, students will be able to: prepare for the final exam) Process Management, Forecasting, Inventory Management, Aggregate Planning and Scheduling, Resources Planning, Supply Chain Management, Quality Management, Waiting Lines, Managing Project Processes, Overview of Operations Management.

Recommended Reading:
Larry P. Ritzman and Lee J. Krajewski, Foundations of Operations Management,Prentice-Hall, 2003.

Teaching Methods:

Assessment Tools: There will be one midterm, and one final exam. The coverage and the format of the exams will be announced in class.

Instruction Language: English

 

BA-201 İş Hukuku (Business Law)
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 3
Semester: Fall
Credits: 3
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Prof. Metin Kutal

Objectives and Contents: Students will have the knowledge about the laws concerning the arrangement of employer and employee relationship in Turkey.General information and historical development; Basic concepts; Employee, apprentice and trainee, employer, employer's representatives, subcontractor, workplace and enterprise; International labor organization; Individual labor law; Collective labor law; Right to strike and lockout; Social security laws.

Recommended Reading:
Demircioğlu-Centel (2003). İş Hukuku, Beta Yayıncılık, İstanbul.
Ali Güzel, Ali Rıza Okur (1998). Güvenlik Hukuku, Beta, İstanbul.
Yusuf Alper (2000). Türkiyede Sosyal Güvenlik, Alfa, Bursa.

Teaching Methods: Classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Two midterms, final exam, attendance

Instruction Language: Turkish

 

BA-202 Accounting
Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 2
Semester: Spring
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
ECTS: 6
Instructor: Prof. Ahmet KIZIL

Objectives and Contents: To teach the accounting to the student as a the art, science and practice concerned with a systematic identifying, collecting, recording, classifying and summarizing in a significant manner and in terms of money, exchange transactions or equivalent economic events of a financial character and interpreting and reporting the results.  Definition of accounting, functions of accounting, basic accounting concepts, generally accepted accounting principles, basic financial statements, accounting books and documents, the accounts, recording and posting, trial balance, end-of-year adjustments, adjusted trial balance, preparing basic financial statements, uniform accounting system.

Recommended Reading:
Charles T.Horngren, W.T.Harrison, L.S.Bamber, Accounting, Prentice-Hall International, Inc. USA
Kizil, Ahmet, Accounting and Tax Applications, Der Yayınları, Istanbul

Teaching Methods: Classroom Discussion

Assesment tools: Homeworks, two midterm exams, final exam

Instruction Language: English